Is it a good idea for Children to do strength training.

Kids and Teens

As a parent, do you worry that strength training might be bad for your developing child, leaving them muscle bound, injured or even stunting their growth? If a young athlete is taught how to do strength training moves correctly then they will stimulate their growth and overall physical development, perform better in school and be far less likely to make unhealthy choices.

Strength Training Improves Performance

Studies have shown that children who play football perform at a higher level when they add strength training to their training regime. In fact, strength training can be much safer than soccer training.


So if you know kids who regularly pull on their Adidas Football Kits from www.kitking.co.uk/brand/adidas and suffer injury, some gentle strength conditioning can help their training and keep them from getting injured. One other benefit of lifting weights is that it’s an activity children really enjoy, so if you need to put the fun back into fitness, encourage your child to take up weight training or crossfit.

Using Weights Safely

Unsurprisingly, it is impossible to have the younger children and the older ones training together. Children develop at different rates. It’s not just in terms of their bone and muscle development, but mentally teenagers will feel uncomfortable if they’re expected to share the gym with little kids.

It is also a good idea not to start with the weights. The first thing they should be doing is the classic push-up, not to many and then burpees, as these kind of multi joint, all body strengtheners can prepare the body for working with weights and also emphasise form over weight lifted.

Weight Training: The Game Changer

By challenging your kids with this type of exercise, you may discover they’re capable of far more than you realise. Kids who engage in weight training or crossfit exercise are often healthier, happier and more confident than their peers, helping them to avoid obesity and develop into healthy adults.

In fact, some studies show obese children who weight trained were far more motivated and focused than those who did cardio exercise. So try building a challenging obstacle course in the garden, get your kids to help you move reasonably heavy items in the garden, or encourage your children to have wheelbarrow races – they’ll enjoy getting fit through strength training without realising!